Starting Sourdough Starter

Starting Sourdough Starter

Disclaimer:  This post is not suitable for the Elimination Phase of the Low Fodmap diet, or for anyone with Wheat/Gluten intolerance.

I have never been fond of the taste of sourdough bread, but there are many sources that promote it as easier to digest, and containing the gut friendly bacteria Lactobacillus.  Julie O’Hara, of Calm Belly Kitchen, had Jennifer Mather do a video presentation on making your own starter, and then bread.  That motivated me to give it a go.  Fingers crossed I will like my homemade sourdough better than any I have ever purchased.

My photos show the 50 ounce glass container I purchased for this project,  a square of cheesecloth, a length of twine to cover the flour & water mixture; the itty- bitty measuring spoon is a “pinch” which is the amount of sugar added to the starter, the yellow dotted sandwich bags have the pre-measured flour to be added each day; while the last photo shows the jar sitting on top of my fridge.

I do tolerate moderate amounts of white wheat flour and am in hopes sourdough will allow me to add back rye and whole wheat flours too.

Parsnip Rice Purée

Parsnip Rice Purée

This blog has suffered since I entered the world of IBS support groups on FaceBook.  Now I am going to turn that around by using the “Tasty Tuesday” posting on Dr. Barbara Bolen’s Freedom From IBS to write up a recipe for both locations.

Fall makes me think root vegetables.

Parsnip Rice Purée

  • 2 large parsnips (12 – 14 ounces), peeled, sliced & dicedimage
  • 2 – 3 TBs unsalted butter
  • 1/4 tsp fresh grated ginger
  • 2 fresh sage leaves, chopped
  • 1 tsp dried chives
  • 1/4 Cup arborio rice **
  • 2 Cups chicken stock
  • salt to taste (I used 1/2 tsp as the butter & stock were not salted)

Melt butter in a heavy bottomed sauce pan.  Add grated ginger, sage, and chives. Stir and sauté for about a minute.  Add the diced parsnips, and stir until they are well coated with the butter mixture.  Cover the pot and let the parsnips get slightly toasted, stirring occasionally.  Add the rice, stir, then add the chicken stock.  Cover and allow to simmer gently for 20 – 25 minutes.  Due to the starchyness of the rice it is important to keep the heat low and to scrape bottom of pan ever few minutes to avoid scorching.

Check doneness by tasting a piece of the diced parsnip.  Purée using a stick immersion blender, or by pouring everything into a food processor or blender.

Yields 4 – 5 servings.

**The rice I used had been ground in a food processor, and also a coffee grinder.  It was an experiment when I ran out of rice flour.  It is not satisfactory for baking so I am using it up as a thickener and in recipes like this one.

Casserole Time

Casserole Time

If you are over 50 and living in the U.S. you probably ate a number of casseroles made with a can of soup during your youth.  I did.  Now I gave them up long before learning about FODMAPs but sometimes a cold, crisp day makes me think about a retro casserole.

I had a good quantity of leftover chicken on hand, two end of garden season itty bitty zucchini, and an open container  lactose free sour cream that I knew I wanted to use.  I added a few other pantry staples to create this Chicken and Rice Casserole.

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  • 14 ounces diced cooked chicken
  • 1 Cup finely shredded raw zucchini
  • 1 + 1/2 Cup cooked rice
  •  3 ounces lactose free sour cream
  • 2 ounces lactose free skim milk
  • 3 Tablespoons chopped green onion tops
  • 1/4 Cup shredded cheddar cheese

1/4 Cup Italian Blend shredded cheese (Organic Valley –  0 sugar per serving = no lactose!)


Prep 4 individual baking dishes, or one medium size casserole dish by spraying with oil of your choice.  Preheat oven to 375 F.

In a large b0wl combine chicken, zucchini, and rice.  In a smaller bowl, whisk sour cream and milk until smooth.   Add green onion tops and cheeses to either bowl, then pour dairy sauce over chicken and rice.  Toss until well mixed.  Place in casserole dish(es) and cover.  Bake for 25 minutes.

—- Like most casseroles this is even better reheated the next day.  Can freeze individual portions for longer storage.

Antipasto Skewers

Antipasto Skewers

Kate Scarlata posted some beautiful Low FODMAP Antipasto Skewers back on JUNE 9, 2016  (click  on date for the recipe.)  I made my own version, omitting the peperoncini that Kate used.  Mine looked pretty good as part of an afternoon buffet.  I used a tiny melon baller to make the little mozzarella balls from a large fresh mozzarella ball.



GF Items for Bake Sale

GF Items for Bake Sale

There is a bazaar taking place Saturday in town to raise funds to support local services that assist those in need.  Since going on the low FODMAP diet forced me to try my hand at gluten-free baking I decide to make some gluten-free items for the baked goods table.  The two recipes I chose are ones I really like a lot and the ones I thought would keep best for a couple of days plus hold up to sitting out in the summer heat.


Click here for my post on this lemon bread.  I made a double batch for the sale.


Visit the Strands of My Life blog for the recipe for these Blueberry Muffins.  I altered the recipe only a tiny bit.  I made 1.5 times the recipe as I had 2 cups of blueberries to use, then I did not have enough sour cream on hand, so I used vanilla yogurt to make up the difference. Suzanne’s recipes are low sugar, so I upped the sweetness by sprinkling extra sugar on top prior to baking.  I love the little crunch it gives these muffins.  Of all the GF baking recipes I have tried these muffins are my  favorite.  I don’t even care for regular Blueberry Muffins but if I have to eat wheat-free these are my go to treat.